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Jack of all Trades

And they (Korach and his following) converged upon Moses and Aaron and said to them: "Enough! Every one of the congregation is holy, and G-d is amongst them. Why do you raise yourself above the congregation of G-d?" (16:3)

There are those who maintain that they have no need of a mentor to guide them through life. They claim, as did Korach, that each and every individual can forge his relationship with G-d unaided. They argue that since the Jewish faith rejects the concept of an intermediary between man and G-d, they have no use for a rebbe or master.

They fail to understand that the entire Jewish people are a single entity, that every individual soul is, in truth, but a limb or organ of the soul of Israel. Just as each limb and organ of the human body has its function at which it excels, so, too, every soul has its role and mission, as well as its limitations. The 'loftiest' of souls is dependant upon the 'lowliest' for the attainment of the single, unified goal. And were any limb to strike out on its own, detaching itself from the 'head' which provides the entire body with vitality and direction - the results are self-understood.

Said Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok of Lubavitch: "When an individual adapts the attitude that he can do it all on his own, he reminds me of the story told about the goyand the tefillin. Once, a Jew noticed a pair of tefillinin the house of a gentile peasant. Upon seeing a holy object in such a place he began to inquire about the tefillin, wishing to purchase them from the goy. The peasant, who had looted the tefillinin a recent pogrom, grew agitated and defensive. "What do you mean, where did I get them?" he blurted out. "Why, I made them myself! I myself am a shoemaker!"

 

 


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